8 steps

Starting your home search can be a daunting task with a seemingly massive mountain to climb to reach your goal. Due to this, I want to make sure you understand each of the 8 steps I take to make this home-buying process as easy and painless as possible, so that you come out at the end of your search with a successful story to tell, in your new home!

Let’s get to know each other! Once you’re ready to start the home buying process, we’ll get together for a Buyer Consultation to talk about your real estate goals and to focus on your search by determining what you’re looking for in a home. 

meet in person

In this vital step in the home-buying process, we’ll talk about getting a pre-qualification to confidently determine your buying price range. There are a number of ways to get a pre-qualification, but if needed I can connect you with a mortgage specialist to help figure out your buying power. In this process, be prepared to dig into your pay stubs, W2s, and tax returns for the lender to do a full review and tell you what you’ll be able to borrow

Pre-qualification

Every situation is different! Are you relocating? Downsizing/upsizing? Family growing? Investing? At this stage, we’ll send you notifications with listings that are tailored just for you. I’m always keeping an eye on the market and new listings, but if you see a property that stands out to you, we’ll move on to the next step: scheduling a showing!

Custom Listing Alerts Based On Your Needs

Now we’re talking! Once we’ve identified one or more properties that you’d like to take a look at in more detail, we’ll schedule a viewing or attend an open house together to see if that home is the perfect one for you. 

Viewing Homes

So you’ve found the right home, you just need it at the right price. When you’re ready, your agent will present an offer to the seller. Your offer may get accepted right away, but many times the seller could counter, or perhaps even reject the offer altogether. I’ll guide you through the initial offer and then navigate the world of counter-offers with you. Once the offer is accepted, we’ll move on with getting your financing in order.

write an offer

So your offer has been accepted – congrats! However, we’ll hold off on celebrations for just a little while longer while the home goes through appraisal and inspection. The appraisal is an unbiased professional’s opinion on the value of the home and is used when a mortgage is involved. Meanwhile, an inspection is done to ensure that there are no major issues inside and outside the home. If there are hiccups during this process, we’ll sort it out and I’ll assist in determining the steps ahead. If it’s all smooth sailing, you’ll be ready to move on to the next and nearly final step!

Acceptance, appraisal and inspection

Now we’re in the home stretch and the excitement is real! This process includes examining all of the paperwork involved and signing on the dotted line (which will be a lot!). Don’t forget all of the paperwork you’ve accumulated and your down payment!

Closing And Getting Those Keys!

Pop the bubbly and begin the move-in process in your NEW HOME!

Congratulations!

There are advantages to both renting and buying, and the answer to this question depends on your situation. I’m sure you’ve heard that mortgage rates are historically low, and locking in now could end up being great for you financially over time. In addition, while renting relieves you from the cost of home ownership and maintenance, it also doesn’t allow you to build equity in property. With rising home prices and low interest rates, if you plan on living somewhere for several years it may be a good idea to look for a home purchase. If you plan on moving multiple times within the next few years, renting may be a better, more flexible option for you.

answer

COLLAPSE

Before you buy a home, your priority should be with keeping close tabs on your credit and getting your finances in order. You can pull your credit for free in many different ways and get full reports to help you clean up any issues. The key to getting a great mortgage rate (and saving yourself a ton of money) is having good credit. Also, make sure your taxes are in order as mortgage companies will need 2-3 years of tax returns to verify income and give you an estimate of your buying power.

If you’re planning on buying a home within the next year, now is the best time to SAVE! The more down payment funds you can provide, the more money you’ll save in the long run by avoiding mortgage insurance and getting a better mortgage rate. It’s a great idea to get pre-qualified with a mortgage professional or local bank so you know what you’ll qualify for.

Lastly, you should reach out to a licensed real estate professional to help you through the process of looking for and putting in offers on your new home. If you’re ready to begin that process, I’m ready to help – let’s get in touch!

answer

COLLAPSE

Getting pre-qualified is an essential part of purchasing a home. The results will let you know what your buying power is, and help you save time by looking for the right homes and give you a better negotiating stance.

To get pre-qualified, you need to gather those important financial documents like W2s, tax returns, and other personal information. From there you can start shopping for different lenders, both local and online. You can also choose to work with a mortgage broker, who can pre-qualify you for different loans and help find you the best loan for your situation.

If you need some mortgage broker recommendations, I’d be happy to assist you!



answer

COLLAPSE

The most common recommendation is that your housing expenses (principle, interest, taxes, and insurance – PITI) not exceed 28% of your GROSS monthly income (pre-tax). When you factor in other debts, such as car payments, student loans, or credit car payments, the total percentage should be no more than 36% of gross income.

Many lenders follow this 28/36 rule, though there are some exceptions. To give yourself an idea of how much home you can afford, calculate your 28/36 for your gross monthly income, then use one of the many home affordability calculators (like this one) you can find online to give yourself an idea!

answer

COLLAPSE

To start off house hunting on the right foot, you should identify all of the home features you have to have. How many bedrooms? Bathrooms? Style? Location/school district? All of these answers will help craft what you’re looking for.

Once you’ve identified your ideal match, it’s time to start looking! When house hunting, try not to see too many houses in one day. The details may start to blur between houses and you may get overwhelmed with all of the unique details that each home offers.

Be realistic about your purchasing power. That kitchen in a million-dollar home may look stunning, but it might not be something houses in the price range you’re looking typically have.

Also, you’re not just buying a house – you’re buying a location too! Be sure to research the area each home you visit is in. How are the schools? Is the neighborhood safe? Spend time in that area to see if there are the conveniences you need.

answer

COLLAPSE

The answer to this really depends on the market itself and the level of desire to own that home. Consult with your real estate agent to find out what comparable homes are going for in that area, so that you can put in a competitive offer without overpaying. 


answer

COLLAPSE

Once you’ve found the perfect house, it’s time to put an offer in on it! This can be one of the most stressful times of the entire home-buying process. Your agent will help prepare the offer, including the offer you’d like to make as well as any contingencies you may want to include.

If the seller likes your offer, they may accept it right away. Many times, a seller will counter an offer which will then put the ball back into your court to either accept, counter again, or reject completely. This process can go back and forth many times, so it’s best to have great communication with your real estate agent so that nothing falls through the cracks!

answer

COLLAPSE

No one likes to overpay for something. That’s especially important for the largest financial purchase you’ll make. Overpaying for a home can put you “underwater” quickly, meaning you’ll immediately owe more than the home is worth right off the bat!

To get the best deal, it’s paramount to know the market and comparable sales in the area. Your real estate agent will be crucial in this step, as a Comparative Market Analysis (CMA) can give you a great idea how much a home is really worth in the current market.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.


answer

COLLAPSE

There are advantages to both renting and buying, and the answer to this question depends on your situation. I’m sure you’ve heard that mortgage rates are historically low, and locking in now could end up being great for you financially over time. In addition, while renting relieves you from the cost of home ownership and maintenance, it also doesn’t allow you to build equity in property. With rising home prices and low interest rates, if you plan on living somewhere for several years it may be a good idea to look for a home purchase. If you plan on moving multiple times within the next few years, renting may be a better, more flexible option for you.

answer

COLLAPSE

Before you buy a home, your priority should be with keeping close tabs on your credit and getting your finances in order. You can pull your credit for free in many different ways and get full reports to help you clean up any issues. The key to getting a great mortgage rate (and saving yourself a ton of money) is having good credit. Also, make sure your taxes are in order as mortgage companies will need 2-3 years of tax returns to verify income and give you an estimate of your buying power.

If you’re planning on buying a home within the next year, now is the best time to SAVE! The more down payment funds you can provide, the more money you’ll save in the long run by avoiding mortgage insurance and getting a better mortgage rate. It’s a great idea to get pre-qualified with a mortgage professional or local bank so you know what you’ll qualify for.

Lastly, you should reach out to a licensed real estate professional to help you through the process of looking for and putting in offers on your new home. If you’re ready to begin that process, I’m ready to help – let’s get in touch!

answer

COLLAPSE

Getting pre-qualified is an essential part of purchasing a home. The results will let you know what your buying power is, and help you save time by looking for the right homes and give you a better negotiating stance.

To get pre-qualified, you need to gather those important financial documents like W2s, tax returns, and other personal information. From there you can start shopping for different lenders, both local and online. You can also choose to work with a mortgage broker, who can pre-qualify you for different loans and help find you the best loan for your situation.

If you need some mortgage broker recommendations, I’d be happy to assist you!



answer

COLLAPSE

The most common recommendation is that your housing expenses (principle, interest, taxes, and insurance – PITI) not exceed 28% of your GROSS monthly income (pre-tax). When you factor in other debts, such as car payments, student loans, or credit car payments, the total percentage should be no more than 36% of gross income.

Many lenders follow this 28/36 rule, though there are some exceptions. To give yourself an idea of how much home you can afford, calculate your 28/36 for your gross monthly income, then use one of the many home affordability calculators (like this one) you can find online to give yourself an idea!

answer

COLLAPSE

To start off house hunting on the right foot, you should identify all of the home features you have to have. How many bedrooms? Bathrooms? Style? Location/school district? All of these answers will help craft what you’re looking for.

Once you’ve identified your ideal match, it’s time to start looking! When house hunting, try not to see too many houses in one day. The details may start to blur between houses and you may get overwhelmed with all of the unique details that each home offers.

Be realistic about your purchasing power. That kitchen in a million-dollar home may look stunning, but it might not be something houses in the price range you’re looking typically have.

Also, you’re not just buying a house – you’re buying a location too! Be sure to research the area each home you visit is in. How are the schools? Is the neighborhood safe? Spend time in that area to see if there are the conveniences you need.

answer

COLLAPSE

The answer to this really depends on the market itself and the level of desire to own that home. Consult with your real estate agent to find out what comparable homes are going for in that area, so that you can put in a competitive offer without overpaying. 


answer

COLLAPSE

Once you’ve found the perfect house, it’s time to put an offer in on it! This can be one of the most stressful times of the entire home-buying process. Your agent will help prepare the offer, including the offer you’d like to make as well as any contingencies you may want to include.

If the seller likes your offer, they may accept it right away. Many times, a seller will counter an offer which will then put the ball back into your court to either accept, counter again, or reject completely. This process can go back and forth many times, so it’s best to have great communication with your real estate agent so that nothing falls through the cracks!

answer

COLLAPSE

No one likes to overpay for something. That’s especially important for the largest financial purchase you’ll make. Overpaying for a home can put you “underwater” quickly, meaning you’ll immediately owe more than the home is worth right off the bat!

To get the best deal, it’s paramount to know the market and comparable sales in the area. Your real estate agent will be crucial in this step, as a Comparative Market Analysis (CMA) can give you a great idea how much a home is really worth in the current market.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.


answer

COLLAPSE

There are advantages to both renting and buying, and the answer to this question depends on your situation. I’m sure you’ve heard that mortgage rates are historically low, and locking in now could end up being great for you financially over time. In addition, while renting relieves you from the cost of home ownership and maintenance, it also doesn’t allow you to build equity in property. With rising home prices and low interest rates, if you plan on living somewhere for several years it may be a good idea to look for a home purchase. If you plan on moving multiple times within the next few years, renting may be a better, more flexible option for you.

answer

COLLAPSE

Before you buy a home, your priority should be with keeping close tabs on your credit and getting your finances in order. You can pull your credit for free in many different ways and get full reports to help you clean up any issues. The key to getting a great mortgage rate (and saving yourself a ton of money) is having good credit. Also, make sure your taxes are in order as mortgage companies will need 2-3 years of tax returns to verify income and give you an estimate of your buying power.

If you’re planning on buying a home within the next year, now is the best time to SAVE! The more down payment funds you can provide, the more money you’ll save in the long run by avoiding mortgage insurance and getting a better mortgage rate. It’s a great idea to get pre-qualified with a mortgage professional or local bank so you know what you’ll qualify for.

Lastly, you should reach out to a licensed real estate professional to help you through the process of looking for and putting in offers on your new home. If you’re ready to begin that process, I’m ready to help – let’s get in touch!

answer

COLLAPSE

Getting pre-qualified is an essential part of purchasing a home. The results will let you know what your buying power is, and help you save time by looking for the right homes and give you a better negotiating stance.

To get pre-qualified, you need to gather those important financial documents like W2s, tax returns, and other personal information. From there you can start shopping for different lenders, both local and online. You can also choose to work with a mortgage broker, who can pre-qualify you for different loans and help find you the best loan for your situation.

If you need some mortgage broker recommendations, I’d be happy to assist you!



answer

COLLAPSE

The most common recommendation is that your housing expenses (principle, interest, taxes, and insurance – PITI) not exceed 28% of your GROSS monthly income (pre-tax). When you factor in other debts, such as car payments, student loans, or credit car payments, the total percentage should be no more than 36% of gross income.

Many lenders follow this 28/36 rule, though there are some exceptions. To give yourself an idea of how much home you can afford, calculate your 28/36 for your gross monthly income, then use one of the many home affordability calculators (like this one) you can find online to give yourself an idea!

answer

COLLAPSE

To start off house hunting on the right foot, you should identify all of the home features you have to have. How many bedrooms? Bathrooms? Style? Location/school district? All of these answers will help craft what you’re looking for.

Once you’ve identified your ideal match, it’s time to start looking! When house hunting, try not to see too many houses in one day. The details may start to blur between houses and you may get overwhelmed with all of the unique details that each home offers.

Be realistic about your purchasing power. That kitchen in a million-dollar home may look stunning, but it might not be something houses in the price range you’re looking typically have.

Also, you’re not just buying a house – you’re buying a location too! Be sure to research the area each home you visit is in. How are the schools? Is the neighborhood safe? Spend time in that area to see if there are the conveniences you need.

answer

COLLAPSE

The answer to this really depends on the market itself and the level of desire to own that home. Consult with your real estate agent to find out what comparable homes are going for in that area, so that you can put in a competitive offer without overpaying. 


answer

COLLAPSE

Once you’ve found the perfect house, it’s time to put an offer in on it! This can be one of the most stressful times of the entire home-buying process. Your agent will help prepare the offer, including the offer you’d like to make as well as any contingencies you may want to include.

If the seller likes your offer, they may accept it right away. Many times, a seller will counter an offer which will then put the ball back into your court to either accept, counter again, or reject completely. This process can go back and forth many times, so it’s best to have great communication with your real estate agent so that nothing falls through the cracks!

answer

COLLAPSE

No one likes to overpay for something. That’s especially important for the largest financial purchase you’ll make. Overpaying for a home can put you “underwater” quickly, meaning you’ll immediately owe more than the home is worth right off the bat!

To get the best deal, it’s paramount to know the market and comparable sales in the area. Your real estate agent will be crucial in this step, as a Comparative Market Analysis (CMA) can give you a great idea how much a home is really worth in the current market.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.


answer

COLLAPSE

There are advantages to both renting and buying, and the answer to this question depends on your situation. I’m sure you’ve heard that mortgage rates are historically low, and locking in now could end up being great for you financially over time. In addition, while renting relieves you from the cost of home ownership and maintenance, it also doesn’t allow you to build equity in property. With rising home prices and low interest rates, if you plan on living somewhere for several years it may be a good idea to look for a home purchase. If you plan on moving multiple times within the next few years, renting may be a better, more flexible option for you.

answer

COLLAPSE

Before you buy a home, your priority should be with keeping close tabs on your credit and getting your finances in order. You can pull your credit for free in many different ways and get full reports to help you clean up any issues. The key to getting a great mortgage rate (and saving yourself a ton of money) is having good credit. Also, make sure your taxes are in order as mortgage companies will need 2-3 years of tax returns to verify income and give you an estimate of your buying power.

If you’re planning on buying a home within the next year, now is the best time to SAVE! The more down payment funds you can provide, the more money you’ll save in the long run by avoiding mortgage insurance and getting a better mortgage rate. It’s a great idea to get pre-qualified with a mortgage professional or local bank so you know what you’ll qualify for.

Lastly, you should reach out to a licensed real estate professional to help you through the process of looking for and putting in offers on your new home. If you’re ready to begin that process, I’m ready to help – let’s get in touch!

answer

COLLAPSE

Getting pre-qualified is an essential part of purchasing a home. The results will let you know what your buying power is, and help you save time by looking for the right homes and give you a better negotiating stance.

To get pre-qualified, you need to gather those important financial documents like W2s, tax returns, and other personal information. From there you can start shopping for different lenders, both local and online. You can also choose to work with a mortgage broker, who can pre-qualify you for different loans and help find you the best loan for your situation.

If you need some mortgage broker recommendations, I’d be happy to assist you!



answer

COLLAPSE

The most common recommendation is that your housing expenses (principle, interest, taxes, and insurance – PITI) not exceed 28% of your GROSS monthly income (pre-tax). When you factor in other debts, such as car payments, student loans, or credit car payments, the total percentage should be no more than 36% of gross income.

Many lenders follow this 28/36 rule, though there are some exceptions. To give yourself an idea of how much home you can afford, calculate your 28/36 for your gross monthly income, then use one of the many home affordability calculators (like this one) you can find online to give yourself an idea!

answer

COLLAPSE

To start off house hunting on the right foot, you should identify all of the home features you have to have. How many bedrooms? Bathrooms? Style? Location/school district? All of these answers will help craft what you’re looking for.

Once you’ve identified your ideal match, it’s time to start looking! When house hunting, try not to see too many houses in one day. The details may start to blur between houses and you may get overwhelmed with all of the unique details that each home offers.

Be realistic about your purchasing power. That kitchen in a million-dollar home may look stunning, but it might not be something houses in the price range you’re looking typically have.

Also, you’re not just buying a house – you’re buying a location too! Be sure to research the area each home you visit is in. How are the schools? Is the neighborhood safe? Spend time in that area to see if there are the conveniences you need.

answer

COLLAPSE

The answer to this really depends on the market itself and the level of desire to own that home. Consult with your real estate agent to find out what comparable homes are going for in that area, so that you can put in a competitive offer without overpaying. 


answer

COLLAPSE

Once you’ve found the perfect house, it’s time to put an offer in on it! This can be one of the most stressful times of the entire home-buying process. Your agent will help prepare the offer, including the offer you’d like to make as well as any contingencies you may want to include.

If the seller likes your offer, they may accept it right away. Many times, a seller will counter an offer which will then put the ball back into your court to either accept, counter again, or reject completely. This process can go back and forth many times, so it’s best to have great communication with your real estate agent so that nothing falls through the cracks!

answer

COLLAPSE

No one likes to overpay for something. That’s especially important for the largest financial purchase you’ll make. Overpaying for a home can put you “underwater” quickly, meaning you’ll immediately owe more than the home is worth right off the bat!

To get the best deal, it’s paramount to know the market and comparable sales in the area. Your real estate agent will be crucial in this step, as a Comparative Market Analysis (CMA) can give you a great idea how much a home is really worth in the current market.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.


answer

COLLAPSE

There are advantages to both renting and buying, and the answer to this question depends on your situation. I’m sure you’ve heard that mortgage rates are historically low, and locking in now could end up being great for you financially over time. In addition, while renting relieves you from the cost of home ownership and maintenance, it also doesn’t allow you to build equity in property. With rising home prices and low interest rates, if you plan on living somewhere for several years it may be a good idea to look for a home purchase. If you plan on moving multiple times within the next few years, renting may be a better, more flexible option for you.

answer

COLLAPSE

Before you buy a home, your priority should be with keeping close tabs on your credit and getting your finances in order. You can pull your credit for free in many different ways and get full reports to help you clean up any issues. The key to getting a great mortgage rate (and saving yourself a ton of money) is having good credit. Also, make sure your taxes are in order as mortgage companies will need 2-3 years of tax returns to verify income and give you an estimate of your buying power.

If you’re planning on buying a home within the next year, now is the best time to SAVE! The more down payment funds you can provide, the more money you’ll save in the long run by avoiding mortgage insurance and getting a better mortgage rate. It’s a great idea to get pre-qualified with a mortgage professional or local bank so you know what you’ll qualify for.

Lastly, you should reach out to a licensed real estate professional to help you through the process of looking for and putting in offers on your new home. If you’re ready to begin that process, I’m ready to help – let’s get in touch!

answer

COLLAPSE

Getting pre-qualified is an essential part of purchasing a home. The results will let you know what your buying power is, and help you save time by looking for the right homes and give you a better negotiating stance.

To get pre-qualified, you need to gather those important financial documents like W2s, tax returns, and other personal information. From there you can start shopping for different lenders, both local and online. You can also choose to work with a mortgage broker, who can pre-qualify you for different loans and help find you the best loan for your situation.

If you need some mortgage broker recommendations, I’d be happy to assist you!



answer

COLLAPSE

The most common recommendation is that your housing expenses (principle, interest, taxes, and insurance – PITI) not exceed 28% of your GROSS monthly income (pre-tax). When you factor in other debts, such as car payments, student loans, or credit car payments, the total percentage should be no more than 36% of gross income.

Many lenders follow this 28/36 rule, though there are some exceptions. To give yourself an idea of how much home you can afford, calculate your 28/36 for your gross monthly income, then use one of the many home affordability calculators (like this one) you can find online to give yourself an idea!

answer

COLLAPSE

To start off house hunting on the right foot, you should identify all of the home features you have to have. How many bedrooms? Bathrooms? Style? Location/school district? All of these answers will help craft what you’re looking for.

Once you’ve identified your ideal match, it’s time to start looking! When house hunting, try not to see too many houses in one day. The details may start to blur between houses and you may get overwhelmed with all of the unique details that each home offers.

Be realistic about your purchasing power. That kitchen in a million-dollar home may look stunning, but it might not be something houses in the price range you’re looking typically have.

Also, you’re not just buying a house – you’re buying a location too! Be sure to research the area each home you visit is in. How are the schools? Is the neighborhood safe? Spend time in that area to see if there are the conveniences you need.

answer

COLLAPSE

The answer to this really depends on the market itself and the level of desire to own that home. Consult with your real estate agent to find out what comparable homes are going for in that area, so that you can put in a competitive offer without overpaying. 


answer

COLLAPSE

Once you’ve found the perfect house, it’s time to put an offer in on it! This can be one of the most stressful times of the entire home-buying process. Your agent will help prepare the offer, including the offer you’d like to make as well as any contingencies you may want to include.

If the seller likes your offer, they may accept it right away. Many times, a seller will counter an offer which will then put the ball back into your court to either accept, counter again, or reject completely. This process can go back and forth many times, so it’s best to have great communication with your real estate agent so that nothing falls through the cracks!

answer

COLLAPSE

No one likes to overpay for something. That’s especially important for the largest financial purchase you’ll make. Overpaying for a home can put you “underwater” quickly, meaning you’ll immediately owe more than the home is worth right off the bat!

To get the best deal, it’s paramount to know the market and comparable sales in the area. Your real estate agent will be crucial in this step, as a Comparative Market Analysis (CMA) can give you a great idea how much a home is really worth in the current market.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.


answer

COLLAPSE

There are advantages to both renting and buying, and the answer to this question depends on your situation. I’m sure you’ve heard that mortgage rates are historically low, and locking in now could end up being great for you financially over time. In addition, while renting relieves you from the cost of home ownership and maintenance, it also doesn’t allow you to build equity in property. With rising home prices and low interest rates, if you plan on living somewhere for several years it may be a good idea to look for a home purchase. If you plan on moving multiple times within the next few years, renting may be a better, more flexible option for you.

answer

COLLAPSE

Before you buy a home, your priority should be with keeping close tabs on your credit and getting your finances in order. You can pull your credit for free in many different ways and get full reports to help you clean up any issues. The key to getting a great mortgage rate (and saving yourself a ton of money) is having good credit. Also, make sure your taxes are in order as mortgage companies will need 2-3 years of tax returns to verify income and give you an estimate of your buying power.

If you’re planning on buying a home within the next year, now is the best time to SAVE! The more down payment funds you can provide, the more money you’ll save in the long run by avoiding mortgage insurance and getting a better mortgage rate. It’s a great idea to get pre-qualified with a mortgage professional or local bank so you know what you’ll qualify for.

Lastly, you should reach out to a licensed real estate professional to help you through the process of looking for and putting in offers on your new home. If you’re ready to begin that process, I’m ready to help – let’s get in touch!

answer

COLLAPSE

Getting pre-qualified is an essential part of purchasing a home. The results will let you know what your buying power is, and help you save time by looking for the right homes and give you a better negotiating stance.

To get pre-qualified, you need to gather those important financial documents like W2s, tax returns, and other personal information. From there you can start shopping for different lenders, both local and online. You can also choose to work with a mortgage broker, who can pre-qualify you for different loans and help find you the best loan for your situation.

If you need some mortgage broker recommendations, I’d be happy to assist you!



answer

COLLAPSE

The most common recommendation is that your housing expenses (principle, interest, taxes, and insurance – PITI) not exceed 28% of your GROSS monthly income (pre-tax). When you factor in other debts, such as car payments, student loans, or credit car payments, the total percentage should be no more than 36% of gross income.

Many lenders follow this 28/36 rule, though there are some exceptions. To give yourself an idea of how much home you can afford, calculate your 28/36 for your gross monthly income, then use one of the many home affordability calculators (like this one) you can find online to give yourself an idea!

answer

COLLAPSE

To start off house hunting on the right foot, you should identify all of the home features you have to have. How many bedrooms? Bathrooms? Style? Location/school district? All of these answers will help craft what you’re looking for.

Once you’ve identified your ideal match, it’s time to start looking! When house hunting, try not to see too many houses in one day. The details may start to blur between houses and you may get overwhelmed with all of the unique details that each home offers.

Be realistic about your purchasing power. That kitchen in a million-dollar home may look stunning, but it might not be something houses in the price range you’re looking typically have.

Also, you’re not just buying a house – you’re buying a location too! Be sure to research the area each home you visit is in. How are the schools? Is the neighborhood safe? Spend time in that area to see if there are the conveniences you need.

answer

COLLAPSE

The answer to this really depends on the market itself and the level of desire to own that home. Consult with your real estate agent to find out what comparable homes are going for in that area, so that you can put in a competitive offer without overpaying. 


answer

COLLAPSE

Once you’ve found the perfect house, it’s time to put an offer in on it! This can be one of the most stressful times of the entire home-buying process. Your agent will help prepare the offer, including the offer you’d like to make as well as any contingencies you may want to include.

If the seller likes your offer, they may accept it right away. Many times, a seller will counter an offer which will then put the ball back into your court to either accept, counter again, or reject completely. This process can go back and forth many times, so it’s best to have great communication with your real estate agent so that nothing falls through the cracks!

answer

COLLAPSE

No one likes to overpay for something. That’s especially important for the largest financial purchase you’ll make. Overpaying for a home can put you “underwater” quickly, meaning you’ll immediately owe more than the home is worth right off the bat!

To get the best deal, it’s paramount to know the market and comparable sales in the area. Your real estate agent will be crucial in this step, as a Comparative Market Analysis (CMA) can give you a great idea how much a home is really worth in the current market.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.


answer

COLLAPSE

There are advantages to both renting and buying, and the answer to this question depends on your situation. I’m sure you’ve heard that mortgage rates are historically low, and locking in now could end up being great for you financially over time. In addition, while renting relieves you from the cost of home ownership and maintenance, it also doesn’t allow you to build equity in property. With rising home prices and low interest rates, if you plan on living somewhere for several years it may be a good idea to look for a home purchase. If you plan on moving multiple times within the next few years, renting may be a better, more flexible option for you.

answer

COLLAPSE

Before you buy a home, your priority should be with keeping close tabs on your credit and getting your finances in order. You can pull your credit for free in many different ways and get full reports to help you clean up any issues. The key to getting a great mortgage rate (and saving yourself a ton of money) is having good credit. Also, make sure your taxes are in order as mortgage companies will need 2-3 years of tax returns to verify income and give you an estimate of your buying power.

If you’re planning on buying a home within the next year, now is the best time to SAVE! The more down payment funds you can provide, the more money you’ll save in the long run by avoiding mortgage insurance and getting a better mortgage rate. It’s a great idea to get pre-qualified with a mortgage professional or local bank so you know what you’ll qualify for.

Lastly, you should reach out to a licensed real estate professional to help you through the process of looking for and putting in offers on your new home. If you’re ready to begin that process, I’m ready to help – let’s get in touch!

answer

COLLAPSE

Getting pre-qualified is an essential part of purchasing a home. The results will let you know what your buying power is, and help you save time by looking for the right homes and give you a better negotiating stance.

To get pre-qualified, you need to gather those important financial documents like W2s, tax returns, and other personal information. From there you can start shopping for different lenders, both local and online. You can also choose to work with a mortgage broker, who can pre-qualify you for different loans and help find you the best loan for your situation.

If you need some mortgage broker recommendations, I’d be happy to assist you!



answer

COLLAPSE

The most common recommendation is that your housing expenses (principle, interest, taxes, and insurance – PITI) not exceed 28% of your GROSS monthly income (pre-tax). When you factor in other debts, such as car payments, student loans, or credit car payments, the total percentage should be no more than 36% of gross income.

Many lenders follow this 28/36 rule, though there are some exceptions. To give yourself an idea of how much home you can afford, calculate your 28/36 for your gross monthly income, then use one of the many home affordability calculators (like this one) you can find online to give yourself an idea!

answer

COLLAPSE

To start off house hunting on the right foot, you should identify all of the home features you have to have. How many bedrooms? Bathrooms? Style? Location/school district? All of these answers will help craft what you’re looking for.

Once you’ve identified your ideal match, it’s time to start looking! When house hunting, try not to see too many houses in one day. The details may start to blur between houses and you may get overwhelmed with all of the unique details that each home offers.

Be realistic about your purchasing power. That kitchen in a million-dollar home may look stunning, but it might not be something houses in the price range you’re looking typically have.

Also, you’re not just buying a house – you’re buying a location too! Be sure to research the area each home you visit is in. How are the schools? Is the neighborhood safe? Spend time in that area to see if there are the conveniences you need.

answer

COLLAPSE

The answer to this really depends on the market itself and the level of desire to own that home. Consult with your real estate agent to find out what comparable homes are going for in that area, so that you can put in a competitive offer without overpaying. 


answer

COLLAPSE

Once you’ve found the perfect house, it’s time to put an offer in on it! This can be one of the most stressful times of the entire home-buying process. Your agent will help prepare the offer, including the offer you’d like to make as well as any contingencies you may want to include.

If the seller likes your offer, they may accept it right away. Many times, a seller will counter an offer which will then put the ball back into your court to either accept, counter again, or reject completely. This process can go back and forth many times, so it’s best to have great communication with your real estate agent so that nothing falls through the cracks!

answer

COLLAPSE

No one likes to overpay for something. That’s especially important for the largest financial purchase you’ll make. Overpaying for a home can put you “underwater” quickly, meaning you’ll immediately owe more than the home is worth right off the bat!

To get the best deal, it’s paramount to know the market and comparable sales in the area. Your real estate agent will be crucial in this step, as a Comparative Market Analysis (CMA) can give you a great idea how much a home is really worth in the current market.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.


answer

COLLAPSE

There are advantages to both renting and buying, and the answer to this question depends on your situation. I’m sure you’ve heard that mortgage rates are historically low, and locking in now could end up being great for you financially over time. In addition, while renting relieves you from the cost of home ownership and maintenance, it also doesn’t allow you to build equity in property. With rising home prices and low interest rates, if you plan on living somewhere for several years it may be a good idea to look for a home purchase. If you plan on moving multiple times within the next few years, renting may be a better, more flexible option for you.

answer

COLLAPSE

Before you buy a home, your priority should be with keeping close tabs on your credit and getting your finances in order. You can pull your credit for free in many different ways and get full reports to help you clean up any issues. The key to getting a great mortgage rate (and saving yourself a ton of money) is having good credit. Also, make sure your taxes are in order as mortgage companies will need 2-3 years of tax returns to verify income and give you an estimate of your buying power.

If you’re planning on buying a home within the next year, now is the best time to SAVE! The more down payment funds you can provide, the more money you’ll save in the long run by avoiding mortgage insurance and getting a better mortgage rate. It’s a great idea to get pre-qualified with a mortgage professional or local bank so you know what you’ll qualify for.

Lastly, you should reach out to a licensed real estate professional to help you through the process of looking for and putting in offers on your new home. If you’re ready to begin that process, I’m ready to help – let’s get in touch!

answer

COLLAPSE

Getting pre-qualified is an essential part of purchasing a home. The results will let you know what your buying power is, and help you save time by looking for the right homes and give you a better negotiating stance.

To get pre-qualified, you need to gather those important financial documents like W2s, tax returns, and other personal information. From there you can start shopping for different lenders, both local and online. You can also choose to work with a mortgage broker, who can pre-qualify you for different loans and help find you the best loan for your situation.

If you need some mortgage broker recommendations, I’d be happy to assist you!



answer

COLLAPSE

The most common recommendation is that your housing expenses (principle, interest, taxes, and insurance – PITI) not exceed 28% of your GROSS monthly income (pre-tax). When you factor in other debts, such as car payments, student loans, or credit car payments, the total percentage should be no more than 36% of gross income.

Many lenders follow this 28/36 rule, though there are some exceptions. To give yourself an idea of how much home you can afford, calculate your 28/36 for your gross monthly income, then use one of the many home affordability calculators (like this one) you can find online to give yourself an idea!

answer

COLLAPSE

To start off house hunting on the right foot, you should identify all of the home features you have to have. How many bedrooms? Bathrooms? Style? Location/school district? All of these answers will help craft what you’re looking for.

Once you’ve identified your ideal match, it’s time to start looking! When house hunting, try not to see too many houses in one day. The details may start to blur between houses and you may get overwhelmed with all of the unique details that each home offers.

Be realistic about your purchasing power. That kitchen in a million-dollar home may look stunning, but it might not be something houses in the price range you’re looking typically have.

Also, you’re not just buying a house – you’re buying a location too! Be sure to research the area each home you visit is in. How are the schools? Is the neighborhood safe? Spend time in that area to see if there are the conveniences you need.

answer

COLLAPSE

The answer to this really depends on the market itself and the level of desire to own that home. Consult with your real estate agent to find out what comparable homes are going for in that area, so that you can put in a competitive offer without overpaying. 


answer

COLLAPSE

Once you’ve found the perfect house, it’s time to put an offer in on it! This can be one of the most stressful times of the entire home-buying process. Your agent will help prepare the offer, including the offer you’d like to make as well as any contingencies you may want to include.

If the seller likes your offer, they may accept it right away. Many times, a seller will counter an offer which will then put the ball back into your court to either accept, counter again, or reject completely. This process can go back and forth many times, so it’s best to have great communication with your real estate agent so that nothing falls through the cracks!

answer

COLLAPSE

No one likes to overpay for something. That’s especially important for the largest financial purchase you’ll make. Overpaying for a home can put you “underwater” quickly, meaning you’ll immediately owe more than the home is worth right off the bat!

To get the best deal, it’s paramount to know the market and comparable sales in the area. Your real estate agent will be crucial in this step, as a Comparative Market Analysis (CMA) can give you a great idea how much a home is really worth in the current market.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.


answer

COLLAPSE

There are advantages to both renting and buying, and the answer to this question depends on your situation. I’m sure you’ve heard that mortgage rates are historically low, and locking in now could end up being great for you financially over time. In addition, while renting relieves you from the cost of home ownership and maintenance, it also doesn’t allow you to build equity in property. With rising home prices and low interest rates, if you plan on living somewhere for several years it may be a good idea to look for a home purchase. If you plan on moving multiple times within the next few years, renting may be a better, more flexible option for you.

answer

COLLAPSE

Before you buy a home, your priority should be with keeping close tabs on your credit and getting your finances in order. You can pull your credit for free in many different ways and get full reports to help you clean up any issues. The key to getting a great mortgage rate (and saving yourself a ton of money) is having good credit. Also, make sure your taxes are in order as mortgage companies will need 2-3 years of tax returns to verify income and give you an estimate of your buying power.

If you’re planning on buying a home within the next year, now is the best time to SAVE! The more down payment funds you can provide, the more money you’ll save in the long run by avoiding mortgage insurance and getting a better mortgage rate. It’s a great idea to get pre-qualified with a mortgage professional or local bank so you know what you’ll qualify for.

Lastly, you should reach out to a licensed real estate professional to help you through the process of looking for and putting in offers on your new home. If you’re ready to begin that process, I’m ready to help – let’s get in touch!

answer

COLLAPSE

Getting pre-qualified is an essential part of purchasing a home. The results will let you know what your buying power is, and help you save time by looking for the right homes and give you a better negotiating stance.

To get pre-qualified, you need to gather those important financial documents like W2s, tax returns, and other personal information. From there you can start shopping for different lenders, both local and online. You can also choose to work with a mortgage broker, who can pre-qualify you for different loans and help find you the best loan for your situation.

If you need some mortgage broker recommendations, I’d be happy to assist you!



answer

COLLAPSE

The most common recommendation is that your housing expenses (principle, interest, taxes, and insurance – PITI) not exceed 28% of your GROSS monthly income (pre-tax). When you factor in other debts, such as car payments, student loans, or credit car payments, the total percentage should be no more than 36% of gross income.

Many lenders follow this 28/36 rule, though there are some exceptions. To give yourself an idea of how much home you can afford, calculate your 28/36 for your gross monthly income, then use one of the many home affordability calculators (like this one) you can find online to give yourself an idea!

answer

COLLAPSE

To start off house hunting on the right foot, you should identify all of the home features you have to have. How many bedrooms? Bathrooms? Style? Location/school district? All of these answers will help craft what you’re looking for.

Once you’ve identified your ideal match, it’s time to start looking! When house hunting, try not to see too many houses in one day. The details may start to blur between houses and you may get overwhelmed with all of the unique details that each home offers.

Be realistic about your purchasing power. That kitchen in a million-dollar home may look stunning, but it might not be something houses in the price range you’re looking typically have.

Also, you’re not just buying a house – you’re buying a location too! Be sure to research the area each home you visit is in. How are the schools? Is the neighborhood safe? Spend time in that area to see if there are the conveniences you need.

answer

COLLAPSE

The answer to this really depends on the market itself and the level of desire to own that home. Consult with your real estate agent to find out what comparable homes are going for in that area, so that you can put in a competitive offer without overpaying. 


answer

COLLAPSE

Once you’ve found the perfect house, it’s time to put an offer in on it! This can be one of the most stressful times of the entire home-buying process. Your agent will help prepare the offer, including the offer you’d like to make as well as any contingencies you may want to include.

If the seller likes your offer, they may accept it right away. Many times, a seller will counter an offer which will then put the ball back into your court to either accept, counter again, or reject completely. This process can go back and forth many times, so it’s best to have great communication with your real estate agent so that nothing falls through the cracks!

answer

COLLAPSE

No one likes to overpay for something. That’s especially important for the largest financial purchase you’ll make. Overpaying for a home can put you “underwater” quickly, meaning you’ll immediately owe more than the home is worth right off the bat!

To get the best deal, it’s paramount to know the market and comparable sales in the area. Your real estate agent will be crucial in this step, as a Comparative Market Analysis (CMA) can give you a great idea how much a home is really worth in the current market.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.

answer

COLLAPSE

A home inspection is not a requirement to purchase a home. But most times, I HIGHLY recommend it! Think of how complex a home is – you have duct work, plumbing, electrical, foundations, roofing, appliances, heating, cooling, etc…a lot of components that can develop problems. The last thing you want in a new home is to have to deal with a big repair expense right after moving in!

Inspections can help discover problems ranging from major structural issues, to minor quick fixes. With the proper contingencies in place, an inspection can prevent you from buying a home riddled with problems that you may not have known about otherwise.


answer

COLLAPSE

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